Jordan’s Principle Program

What is Jordan’s Principle?

Jordan’s Principle is named in memory of Jordan River Anderson, a young boy from Norway House Cree Nation. Jordan was born in 1999 with multiple disabilities and stayed in the hospital from birth. When he was two years old, doctors said he could move to a special home for his medical needs. However, the federal and provincial governments could not agree who should pay for his home-based care. As a result, Jordan never got to spend even one night at home, and he passed away at the age of five in the hospital.

In 2007, the House of Commons passed Jordan’s Principle, a commitment to ensure First Nation children would get the products, services, and supports they need, when they need them. It covers a wide range of health, social, and educational needs. That commitment is still in the process of being fully honoured.

  • Jordan’s Principle is a legal requirement resulting from Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings
  • Jordan’s Principle is a child-first principle that aims to eliminate service inequities and delays for First Nation children
  • Jordan’s Principle states that any public service ordinarily available to all other children must be made available to First Nation children without delay or denial

How can the SCO Jordan’s Principle Coordinators help?

The SCO Jordan’s Principle Coordinators assist First Nation children and youth (up to 18 years of age) and their families at the Specialized Services for Children and Youth (SSCY) Centre and the Winnipeg School Division to access programs, services, and supports to improve health, education and social outcomes for First Nation children.

The SCO Jordan’s Principle Coordinators help families by:

  • Assisting with the application and appeals process to access federal Jordan’s Principle funding
  • Depending on the unique needs of the child, Jordan’s Principle may include mobility aids, wheelchair ramps, assessments and screenings, medical supplies and equipment, mental health and wellness services, respite care, a personal support worker or social worker, school supplies, tutoring services, teaching assistants, psycho-educational assessments, assistive technology and electronics
  • Providing support, navigation, and advocacy to appropriate programs, services and/or agencies and work with service providers in a responsive and coordinated manner
  • Attending appointments and/or case conferencing with families as required
  • Providing culturally safe drop-in and/or meeting space for First Nation families so they are properly informed and engaged in their child’s health, educational, and social progress
  • Collaborating with service providers, including First Nation community-based Jordan’s Principle Case Coordinators, Tribal Council Service Coordinators, Eagle Urban Transition Centre and others, to provide wrap-around services for children and youth
  • Assisting families to access cultural support services and programs based on cultural beliefs and practices, for example land-based activities and support from Elders and Knowledge Keepers

We maintain confidentiality in accordance with The Personal Health Information Act to ensure personal health information is kept private, safe, and secure.

Who is eligible:

Children and youth who meet one of the following criteria are eligible for Jordan’s Principle services:

  • registered or eligible to be registered as a Status First Nations person under the Indian Act
  • has one parent or guardian who is registered or eligible to be registered as a Status First Nations person under the Indian Act
  • recognized by their Nation for the purposes of Jordan’s Principle
  • ordinarily resident on reserve

Specialized Services for Children and Youth (sscy.ca)

Winnipeg School Division (winnipegsd.ca)

Contact Us!

Michelle Klippenstein, Jordan’s Principle Coordinator at SSCY Centre
Phone: 204-946-1869 ext. 200
Toll Free: 1-866-876-9701
Email: jpsscy@scoinc.mb.ca