First Nations Health Services Navigator

SCO's First Nations Health Services Navigator can help you navigate the following services and benefits:

Jordan's Principle Navigation

Non-Insured Health Benefits Navigation


What is Jordan's Principle?

Jordan's Principle is named in memory of Jordan River Anderson, a young boy from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba. Jordan was born in 1999 with multiple disabilities and stayed in the hospital from birth. When he was two years old, doctors said he could move to a special home for his medical needs. However, the federal and provincial governments could not agree on who should pay for his home-based care. As a result, Jordan never got to spend even one night at home, and he passed away at the age of five in the hospital.

In 2007, the House of Commons passed Jordan's Principle, a commitment to ensure First Nation children would get the products, services, and supports they need, when they need them. It covers a wide range of health, social, and educational needs.

  • Jordan’s Principle is a legal requirement resulting from Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) rulings.
  • Jordan’s Principle is a child-first principle that aims to eliminate service inequities and delays for First Nation children.
  • Jordan’s Principle states that any public service ordinarily available to all other children must be made available to First Nation children without delay or denial.

What does the SCO First Nation Health Services Navigator do?

The SCO First Nation Health Services Navigator serves all First Nation children and their families accessing the Specialized Services for Children and Youth Centre (SSCY) and helps families in the following ways:

  • Serves as a culturally appropriate point of contact for children with disabilities and their families
  • Provides navigation to appropriate programs, departments and/or agencies
  • May attend medical appointments and/or case conferencing with families on request
  • Provides culturally safe drop-in and/or meeting space for First Nation families
  • Collaborates with appropriate service providers and/or programs, both within SSCY Centre, as well as externally, such as with:
    • First Nations community-based Jordan’s Principle Case Coordinators
    • Tribal Council Service Coordinators
    • Eagle Urban Transition Centre
    • Rehabilitation Centre for Children
    • St. Amant
    • Adolescent Treatment Centre
    • Society for Manitobans with Disabilities
  • Maintains confidentiality in accordance with Personal Health Information Act standards to ensure personal information is kept private, safe, and secure
  • Assists families with Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) such as medical transportation, vision, dental services, prescription drugs, and medical supplies when requested
  • Provides information on eligible Non-Insured Health Benefits and benefit amounts, such as for eyeglasses, and how to address denials and appeals

What is SSCY?

Specialized Services for Children and Youth (SSCY) is an initiative that brings together in one location the services needed for children and youth with disabilities and special needs in Manitoba. It improves the coordination and integration of services for children and families.

SSCY is an alliance of government departments, the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA), and various service provider agencies.

SSCY Centre is located at 1155 Notre Dame Avenue in Winnipeg.

Contact Us!

First Nation Health Services Navigator
Phone 1-204-946-1869 ext. 120
Toll Free 1-866-876-9701
8:30am – 4:30pm
Monday - Friday
Email: Health.Navigator@scoinc.mb.ca

First Nations Services Navigator Brochure

First Nations Services Navigator Brochure